Of mice and men animal imagery

They are able to speak to Lennie and in his mind they are the voice of his conscience.

Strong as a bull of mice and men

Lennie's mental retardation comes across clearly, as he is presented as almost less than human. The use of imagery related to the natural world generally, and animals in particular is one which can be seen throughout the novel It reflects the fact that Steinbeck had spent a lot of time in this area and accuracy in his description was important to him. They'll tie ya up with a collar, like a dog. He follows orders, even when he doesn't know the harm they might cause. It also makes up for hi lack of brain — he just needs to be strong — in this world where the men are judged on their ability to work Lennie would be a valuable commodity to the boss — he could do the work of two 2 www. The image links the two events together in the mind of the reader and reminds us of just how strong Lennie is. He falls to his knees and slurps water from the river, just as a horse might, or a dog drinking water from a bowl. Animal 5: While taunting Lennie with the idea that George might not come back, Crooks predicts Lennie's fate without George: "Want me to tell ya what'll happen? One of the most obvious uses of animal imagery is in the descriptions of Lennie which abound with comparisons with creatures. In a sense Lennie does not realise his own strength and power and finds it difficult to use his hands in a gentle or delicate way. He loves this particular animal because he once saw some at a fair in Sacramento. Animal 6: After Lennie kills Curley's wife, he attempts to hide what he has done: "He pawed up the hay until it partly covered her.

It seems to be a fitting end. The fate of the puppy given to Lennie by Slim seems sealed from the start.

What are the three animals that make tracks in the sand or mud of the river of mice and men

His hands being like paws signify his size and strength. Page 11, "feeling on it like it was a mouse" this is comparing the dress of the girl in Weed to the mouse that Lennie had, it shows his lack of perception as well as the vast lack of logic that is the main difference between him and all other normal people. He loves this particular animal because he once saw some at a fair in Sacramento. This imagery also demonstrates his attention to detail as a writer. At the end of the novel little has changed apart from the presence of death. The way the old dog follows Carlson so trustingly mirrors the way Lennie obeys George at the end. It seems to be a fitting end. The imagery of rabbits runs throughout the novel and is always associated with Lennie and his dream of a better place. The rabbits are presented as innocent and cute in their natural setting but the tranquillity of the setting is deceptive, an illusion, representing the calm before the storm whilst the grotesque imaginary rabbit in the last section is not only a distortion of nature but a recognition that the natural world order has been overturned.

We are alerted to the fact that Lennie kills the things that he pets very early on in the novel, therefore. Therefore, it is significant that Steinbeck immediately mentions an animal when he first describes Lennie.

what animals does lennie like to pet

The imagery of rabbits runs throughout the novel and is always associated with Lennie and his dream of a better place. Terriers are traditionally bred as dogs to hunt small animals and will go to great lengths to catch them. In the opening paragraphs of the novel, Steinbeck creates a picture of the natural world as a beautiful place which is disturbed by humans.

what is revealed about lennie and george?s friendship in this passage?

George tells Slim that Lennie will do anything he tells him to, even jump into the river when he doesn't know how to swim. The image links the two events together in the mind of the reader and reminds us of just how strong Lennie is.

what is revealed about lennie and george?s friendship in this passage?

Here we have the image of a man who is not intelligent enough to check if the water is fresh, but who also drinks in a very animal-like fashion.

It represents a place of life that has not been disturbed by death.

Of mice and men man and the natural world

Both Lennie and the snake are doing things that are natural and normal to them when their lives are ended. The rabbits are presented as innocent and cute in their natural setting but the tranquillity of the setting is deceptive, an illusion, representing the calm before the storm whilst the grotesque imaginary rabbit in the last section is not only a distortion of nature but a recognition that the natural world order has been overturned. George demands the mouse. We are alerted to the fact that Lennie kills the things that he pets very early on in the novel, therefore. Just like the fish when out of water Curley would be struggling for breath. They are part of a fantasy world which Lennie clings on to as a way of having some purpose in his life and hope for something better. In the opening paragraphs of the novel, Steinbeck creates a picture of the natural world as a beautiful place which is disturbed by humans. It is shortly after this that George finds Lennie and shoots him. In a sense Lennie does not realise his own strength and power and finds it difficult to use his hands in a gentle or delicate way. Animal 3: In the description of how he used to play tricks on Lennie, the comparison between Lennie and George as dog and master is reinforced. It is also unexpected for him. Animal 7: As he enters the brush, Lennie's movement is compared to that of a bear.
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Notes on Of Mice and Men Themes